Thomas Dimopoulos

Thomas Dimopoulos

City Beat and Arts & Entertainment Editor
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Friday, 26 January 2018 15:31

Performance Announcements

Return of the Dead

Dead & Company, featuring Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, John Mayer and Bob Weir with Oteil Burbridge & Jeff Chimenti will stage a show at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center on June 11. Tickets are $149.50, $99.50, $75.50, lawn - $45, and are available online at LiveNation.com, Ticketmaster.com or Charge By Phone at 1-800-745-3000.

      

SPAC to Host Quintet of Country Music Concerts

Promoter Live Nation has announced five country music concerts that will be staged at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center this summer, and sales of a “2018 Country Megaticket” that will allow fans to attend all five shows.

The concerts include: Keith Urban with Kelsea Ballerini on June 27; Rascal Flatts on July 7; Jason Aldean with Luke Combs and Lauren Alaina on July 15; Dierks Bentley with Brothers Osborne and Lanco on Aug. 5, and Luke Bryan with Jon Pardi and Morgan Wallen on Aug. 19.

The Megaticket sale begins Friday, Jan. 26 and goes through Feb. 24, and is as follows: Gold: $695 – Secure the same reserved seat to all five shows in sections 1-7 or 15-18 plus get one premier parking pass per show, per pair. Silver: $450 – secure the same reserved seat to all five shows in sections 8-14 or 19-30; Lawn:  $159 – spend an evening on the lawn with a ticket to all five shows. Tickets available at Megaticket.com. Shows will go on sale individually at later dates. Ticket subject to service charges.

 

Kuinka Performs at Caffe Lena Saturday          

Pacific Northwest band Kuinka performs at Caffe Lena 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 27 in advance of a 17-city tour through the western states. The dynamic string band’s new EP, “Stay Up Late,” will be released June 2. Tickets to the local show are $18 general admission, $16 members and $9 students and kids.

 

Funkadelic George Clinton Coming to the Mountaintop for 3-Day Fest

George Clinton, Sturgill Simpson, Alt-J, and Jack Johnson lead a musical cast of dozens slated to perform at this year’s three-day Mountain Jam concert, June 15-17, on Hunter Mountain.  

Mountain Jam will also feature yoga events, an Awareness Village with exhibits from not-for-profit organizations and a children's activity tent (those under 10 are admitted for free with a paid adult). Other activities include a Sky Ride offering scenic views of the Catskill Mouintains and North America's longest, highest zipline.

A three-day general admission pass is $184; a three-day pass with campground access is $219. For more information, go to: http://mountainjam.com/.  

 

Avant Folk Duo Bringing Sound and Verse to Saratoga and Schenectady

Billed as an “avantgarde folk duo,” and sporting impeccable influences that run the gamut from Laurie Anderson and Meredith Monk to Patti Smith, Anna & Elizabeth will be stage a show at Taylor Music Center at Union College on Feb. 23 and at Caffe Lena on April 20. The duo will performs new music from their upcoming Smithsonian Folkways debut, “The Invisible Comes to Us,” which is out March 30. Tickets for the Caffe Lena show are $22 general admission/ $ 20 members, and $11 students and kids.  

 

The Championship Tour at SPAC

Kendrick Lamar with special guests: Schoolboy Q, Sza, Jay Rock, Ab-Soul, Isaiah Rashad, Sir, Lance Skiiwalker and Zacari, will perform at SPAC June 9. Tickets are $125, $89.50, $49.50, $39.50, lawn $35 and available online at LiveNation.com, Ticketmaster.com or Charge By Phone at 1-800-745-3000.

 

Sawyer Fredericks to Perform Sunday on Live TV Fundraiser

ALBANY - Singer-songwriter Sawyer Fredericks will perform live during the #518Gives televised fundraiser to benefit the Center for Disability Services on Sunday, Jan. 28.

Fredericks is scheduled to appear at 5:40 p.m. and 6 p.m. and the broadcast airs from noon to 7 p.m. from the Radisson Hotel Albany, 205 Wolf Road, in Colonie. The all live, all local show airs on WXXA/FOX23 (cable channel 8, or check listings). All proceeds support the Center and its divisions, Down Syndrome Aim High Resource Center, Life Quality Solutions Incubator, Prospect Center in Queensbury and St. Margaret’s Center in Albany.

The Center is celebrating 76 years of service to the community in 2018 and offers opportunities for achievement, hope and innovation to people with disabilities and their families. Text 518Gives to 41444 to donate or give online at www.cfdsny.org. Call 518-459-7070 to make a pledge that day to benefit the Center. For more information, search #518Gives, or go to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter @cfdsny.

SCHUYLERVILLE – One thousand one-of-a-kind bowls have been crafted and five area chefs are busily comingling spices in preparation of Saturday’s 7th annual Chili Bowl at the Saratoga Clay Arts Center.

The five chefs, each of whom showcase their culinary talents at area restaurants, are making 30 gallons of chili each.

“That’s 150 gallons in total” says Jill Fishon-Kovachick, who founded Saratoga Clay Arts Center in 2011. What does 150 gallons of chili look like? “I have no idea,” she says, with a laugh, “but we’ll need it.”

The event has grown in popularity in each of its first six years and attracted approximately 700 people in 2017.  The cost of admission: $2, or the donation of two non-perishable food items. Samples of chili will be distributed at the event and a vote-for-the-best chili competition will be held. Defending champion Pat Brown of the Brook Tavern, will face competing chili chefs Jonathan Quinn of Osteria Danny, Dave Zuka of Ravenous Creperie, Michele Morris of Scallions and Brian Bowden of R&R Kitchen and bar.  

More than 1,000 one-of-a-kind hand-crafted chili bowls will be available for the event. The bowls usually retail for $25 to $100. For this event, organizers say: fill the bowl, eat the chili, and keep the bowl for $20. 

“We’ll also be raffling off one of my pieces,” says Fishon-Kovachick, a ceramic artist and collector who first began working with clay at the age of 11, after attending an educational summer camp at Buck's Rock Performing and Creative Arts Camp in Connecticut. 

A portion of proceeds from the event will benefit the Wilton Food Pantry, and To Life! The latter is a local organization that serves a 10-county area and tasked to educate the community about breast cancer detection, treatments and related health matters, and to provide support services to breast cancer patients, caregivers, family and friends.

The Wilton Food Pantry provides the equivalent of 30,000 meals annually. More than one-third of those served by the pantry on Ballard Road are children. The highest non-perishable food items on its list include: peanut butter, canned fruit, bottles of 100 percent fruit juice, juice boxes and canned tuna or salmon.

Advance registration, with specified reserve time slots, may be made online at saratogaclayarts.org. Those registering in advance may also select and pre-pay online for bowls and simply pick them up when attending the event. Last-minute walk-ins to the center are also welcome without pre-registration.

The event takes place 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 27. Saratoga Clay Arts Center is located at 167 Hayes Road, Schuylerville. Robonics Reggae Band, known for their warm weather inspired rhythms and quirky steel-drum renditions of tunes like the theme from “The Godfather” and “Mission Impossible,” will provide live entertainment. 

by Thomas Dimopoulos

Saratoga TODAY

City Council

- The City Council this week unanimously approved two additions to the city’s existing Rules of Conduct for Council meetings. The first identifies agenda items determined to not require council discussion – which are typically singularly listed on the “regular meeting agenda” and require line-reading - and instead places them on the “consent agenda” - which is approved en masse. The move is expected to result in some time-saving measures during public council meetings.      

The second addition allows the mayor the authority to declare an immediate meeting recess should the conduct of any person “impede the Council from conducting public business.” If order cannot be maintained following the recess, the council meeting may then be declared adjourned, until a future date. 

- The Saratoga Springs Recreation Commission, a 7-member mayor-appointed board of community volunteers, announced the following programs and leagues will take place 2018: Registration for the recreation department’s Soccer League and Spring Program will begin Jan. 29.  Volunteer coaches and paid referees are needed.

Camp Saradac registration begins Feb. 26 for city residents, and March 19 for all residents. 

Future registration dates: Summer programs - April 9; Fall soccer – June 4; Fall programs – Aug. 6; Intro to Ice and Basketball – Sept. 4, and winter 2018 program registration begins Nov. 5.  

- Mayor Kelly announced the State of the City address will be held at the Saratoga Springs City Center at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 1. Kelly also thanked the City Center of waiving the venue usage fee.

- Supervisor Matt Veitch reported a Jan. 9 meeting was staged with the Saratoga County Capital Resource Corporation to enable low-interest financing for a new science building at Skidmore College. The amount of financing asked for was $35 million, up to a $42 million cap, Veitch said. The overall cost of the new building is anticipated to be approximately $65 million. “So, we’re providing low-interest financing for about half the project,” Veitch explained.

CRC provides financing for expansion and construction projects and had previously been involved in the financing and re-financing of local developments such as the expansion at Saratoga Hospital, the updates to the Raymond Watkins apartments and for a St. Peter’s Hospital project. The Saratoga County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved the measure Tuesday, Veitch said.

Planning Board

The city’s Planning Board is scheduled to consider a variety of large-scale proposal applications this week. They include:

- Rip Van Dam, 353 Broadway. Site plan modification: increasing room count from 142 rooms to 152 rooms; slight reduction of footprint, bringing building to the sidewalk; eliminating proposed sixth-floor ballroom and replacing it with a pool and a restaurant.   

- Adelphi Hotel Partners, owners of property at 19/23 Washington St.: SEQR consideration of lead agency status and coordinated review for construction of 62,567 square-foot hotel and spa.

- Ballston Avenue Townhouses, at 96 and 116 Ballston Ave/ Route 50. Residential construction, site plan review. 

- Spencer Subdivision, Kaydeross Park Road and Arrowhead Road. Proposed 22-lot residential subdivision totaling approximately 12.63 acres.

- Regatta View, Phase 3, Union Avenue & Dyer Switch Road & Regatta View Drive: Site plan review for construction of 24 residential units within the Interlaken PUD District.

- 79 Henry Street: renovation of building. The renovation had initially received Planning Board approval in 2014; there are proposed changes to the approved building design.

- Earlier this month, the city Zoning Board of Appeals upheld its May 2017 interpretation that a proposed new Code Blue permanent shelter on Walworth Street is zoning compliant. The Planning Board is expected to rule on the project’s final approval, although that vote did not appear among the Board’s agenda items this week. The Planning Board is slated to next convene for a full meeting at 6 p.m. Feb. 1 at City Hall.

I was 12 years old and sprawled across the back seat of the family station wagon – a big-finned, hardtop machine with wicked tail lights and heavy metal side panels painted the color of wood. Dad sat in the driver’s seat, directly in front of me, losing his mind.

My sister and I had reached the age when promises of ice cream sodas and enticement of egg creams in exchange for orderly behavior – can you just sit still, for five minutes, please! – no longer carried significance. If we were going to be bribed into silence, it was going to take cash. Five bucks apiece, to be precise. Our palms dutifully greased with paper greenbacks depicting a serious-looking Abe Lincoln, we giddily trotted into the department store. It was a momentous occasion: each of us setting out to purchase our first record album. Dad waited in the car. My sister chose an album by The Beatles: love, love, love, blah, blah, blah. I made a beeline for the new releases. The Rolling Stones. Sticky Fingers.

I cradled it in my arms, this inspired 12-inch by 12-inch platter, double-wrapped in an opaque shopping bag, the contents within filled with strut and swagger and songs about slave-owners and demon lives and drugs, salivating Pavlovian dogs, mad, mad days on the road and nightdreams of sins and of lies and living after we’ve died. 

“Beatles, very nice,” said dad, during the unveiling of the albums in the family station wagon. “And you?”

He gazed over the back of the album jacket first, which was festooned with a bright sticker that depicted a big red mouth and a long unfurling tongue. It was the album’s front side that got the more immediate reaction. Here was a near life size snapshot of a human torso wearing a pair of jeans upon which was fixed a working zipper. When unzipped, the jacket revealed an inner-jacket picture of a pair of cotton briefs. To this day I’m not sure what dad said when examining the zipper-front, other than the sound of the words seemed to emanate from somewhere deep in the gut. The jargon itself was a mash-up of words that mixed phrases from the Old Country, new American slang and some otherworld language yet-to-be invented. 

Of course, immediately, I was hooked.

“God knows what I’m on about on that song,” Mick Jagger told Rolling Stone magazine many years later, when asked about his lyrics for the album’s first track, “Brown Sugar.” “It’s such a mishmash,” Jagger said.  “All the nasty subjects in one go.”

The Rolling Stones debuted a rough working version of “Brown Sugar” at the Altamont festival in 1969 - the first song in the setlist performed immediately after that infamous stabbing captured in the film “Gimme Shelter.” Despite the karmic baggage, when it was finally released as a single a year-and-a-half later, it climbed up the American charts and all the way to number one, displacing Three Dog Night’s six-week cling to the top of the charts - with “Joy to the World” of all things - and provided a daring counterpoint to chart-topping snoozers by Carole King - “It’s Too Late,” James Taylor -“You’ve Got A Friend,” and the Bee Gees’ “How Can You Mend A Broken Heart” - that would soon follow.       

“Sticky Fingers” begins, as most good things do, with a succession of scything Keith-chords, adds a dose of heavy horns, and a killer rhythm section highlighted by the booming of Charlie bass-drum beats, as Mick Jagger releases the pent-up verse: Gawlko slayship bownfocottan feels/ sawld in-a-mawket-down in New Awleens…  

The album was released at an important time in popular rock and roll history: the Beatles had broken up, Bob Dylan a recluse and the trippy-hippy ‘60s were over. ‘Sticky Fingers’ boasts 10 songs in all, and not a throwaway tune in the bunch. There is the acoustic beauty of songs like “Wild Horses” and “Moonlight Mile,” the Gram Parsons-inspired country-rock-and-tonk of “Dead Flowers,” the heavy horn and musical jam explorations of “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking,” and the solemn hair-on-your-neck at attention moodiness of “Sister Morphine.”

The Rolling Stones classic 1971 album "Sticky Fingers" is the focus of the next Rochmon Record Club Listening Party, which takes place Tuesday, Jan. 16 at Caffe Lena. I can’t wait to see and hear what Rochmon’s got lined up for the night. Doors at 6:30 p.m. and show time is at 7. A word of advice: If you want a seat, get there early. A $5 donation is suggested. Donations go to the restoration funds of Caffe’ Lena and Universal Preservation Hall.

Thursday, 11 January 2018 19:10

Neighbors: Bill Cole

Who: Bill Cole.

Where: Phila Street.

How long have you had a woodwind shop? 

Forty years. I started out in Watervliet and about 15 years I moved up to Saratoga Springs.

How did you get into the business?

A teacher encouraged me to go to school for music. I was drawn to one program specifically that taught band instrument repair. Music instrument technology trained you how to fix instruments: woodwinds, brass and strings. When I got out I started my own shop, temporarily. Forty years later, here I am.  

It's a niche market, isn’t it?

Even within my field I have a niche. Most music stores go after the big school accounts, and although I’m very happy to work on school instruments, I’m really targeting the pro horns. So, I get customers from across the country. It’s a special market and one I enjoy.

Have you ever had a brush with fame?

Over and over again. I have a book, about 300 pages, I hope to write it someday of all the things that have happened over 40 years. You’re standing right here next to Garth Hudson’s saxophone; he’s a friend of mine and we’ve had a lot of correspondence with Garth and The Band. Dave Matthews Band – we work on Jeff Coffin’s instrument when he comes to town. Chicago. Jethro Tull. Those are the big guys, but the real honor is working for the professional musician who’s playing (locally at jazz clubs) – because you know their passion for playing is so important. To be a part of that is great.

Do you play?

I don’t play professionally. Both my son and I play when we fix the instruments, but our job is to fix them; their job is to play them.   

What did you want to be when you were a kid?

An engineer or an architect. To this day I look at the buildings that are going up and I just marvel at them. I’ve always had a passion for that. 

What are some of the best things Saratoga Springs has to offer?

When I have customers who come into town for the first time and looking for some direction about what to do, I tell them go to SPAC, have a picnic, and on the way back go to Congress Park and visit the museum; they’re going to get some nature, they’re going to get some history and then all you have to do is walk down the street and see the beautiful buildings that have been built, the beautiful buildings that have been restored. Saratoga just has something for everybody.

Who would portray you in a movie about your life?

I would say Johnny Depp, ha. He would have to shave his head and gain some weight – but I think he could nail it. Plus, he’s one of my favorite actors.   

SARATOGA SPRINGS – The city based Code Blue emergency shelter, which has had a transitory geographic existence since its opening in late 2013, has one final hurdle before landing in a permanent home.

Earlier this week, the city Zoning Board of Appeals upheld its May 2017 interpretation that the proposed new permanent shelter on Walworth Street is zoning compliant. The ZBA’s unanimous 7-0 decision came in the aftermath of a legal challenge to halt its development, led by a group of 22 area residents, claiming the development is not a permitted use within the Urban Residential Zoning District.

Following the ZBA’s Jan. 8 approval, the 22 Franklin Street residents opposed to the project issued a statement saying they were disappointed by the “erroneous determination” and that they will be identifying their next steps and actions “in the near future." The group has until Feb. 7 to file an appeal. Claudia Braymer, an attorney representing the residents, said on Wednesday the group had yet to make a final decision regarding an appeal.

The Code Blue Saratoga program was born from the tragic death of Nancy Pitts. The 54-year-old mother of two sought shelter on a Williams Street porch during a frigid December night in 2013. She was discovered by police the next morning. Within days of the homeless woman’s death, a cooperative partnership between then mayor-elect Joanne Yepsen, non-profit organizations, and members of the community was initiated, and a plan set in motion to site an emergency shelter in the city. Since that time, a series of temporary shelters have been housed at St. Peter’s Parish Center, the west-of Broadway Salvation Army building, and the east-of Broadway Soul Saving Station Church, and at times met with public opposition by some residents who lived near the location where the shelter was to be sited.

Last February, local business owner Ed Mitzen announced he would donate the funds to construct a permanent Code Blue homeless shelter atop Shelters of Saratoga property on Walworth Street. Shelters of Saratoga, or S.O.S., oversees the Code Blue emergency program and operates a case managed shelter and a twice-a-week “drop-in” center - which draws 20 to 22 people each day - at its two existing buildings on the property.  

S.O.S. Executive Director Michael Finocchi said having the Code Blue emergency shelter on its grounds benefit those seeking help and provide a greater continuum of services.  “First off, we won’t have to go looking for another (temporary emergency) place every year and it will also enable us to share services between Shelters of Saratoga and Code Blue – housing services, employment services; we can offer more to these individuals. This project will allow us to more easily connect homeless individuals with the support services they need.”

The city based shelter initially would open when temperatures dipped below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, but in early 2017 Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an executive order which directed emergency shelters to operate when temperatures drop below 32 degrees. Currently, Code Blue is temporarily housed at the Soul Saving Station Church on Henry Street, where since mid-November the 41-bed shelter has been at full capacity. The proposed new building will consist of approximately 6,500 square feet of space and house about 50 beds. The two-story building is slated to include a large kitchen, laundry room, men’s and women’s sleeping rooms, multiple showers and bathrooms, a large storage area for donated food and clothing, and a small Code Blue office.

On a single night in 2017, 553,742 people were experiencing homelessness in the United States and more than one-fifth of those people were children, according to the Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which was released December 2017.  The number of people experiencing homelessness increased in 14 states between 2007 and 2017, and the largest absolute increases were in New York State – up by 43 percent during that time, according to the report, which notes that there are about 89,500 who are homeless in New York. And while New York may also have a greater population than many others, the national average state-by-state indicates 17 people per 10,000 are homeless, while in New York that ratio jumps to 45 people per 10,000 - a ranking that places N.Y. third worst in the nation. 

The proposed permanent shelter Code Blue location heads for final approval back to the Planning Board, which meets for a workshop – a pre-meeting gathering – on Tuesday and for its full meeting Thursday, Jan. 18 when it is anticipated to discuss the matter.  The proposal is not expected to meet much resistance; the Planning Board was unanimous in its support of a special use permit and site plan review for the facility, last July.

“It’s got to go back to the Planning Board, but we won’t have to go through the whole process like we did the first time,” Finocchi said. “It was already there before, and the vote was 7-0. Once we get our approval we can file for a building permit.”

Depending on the length of this year’s spring thaw, the site housing the permanent Code Blue shelter building could be operational by the 2018-19 winter season, which begins next November.

Mayor Meg Kelly, who began her term Jan. 1, thanked the ZBA following Monday’s unanimous agreement. “Code Blue is a community problem and we all must come together as a community to solve this problem. We are better as a group to help the homeless during these brutally cold nights,” Kelly said. 

 

The proposed Code Blue permanent shelter: 

code blue prop Screenshot 2018-01-09 14.39.34.png

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Two weeks into the winter season coupled with predictions that forecast freezing temperatures for most every day this month are pushing the status of the city based homeless shelter from emergency status into a near 24/7 operation.   

Code Blue Saratoga, a program of Shelters of Saratoga, provides temporary unrestricted shelter during periods of hazardous winter weather - defined as 12 inches or more of snow and/or a temperature of 32 degrees or less, to include wind chill factor. Last year, the shelter was opened 28 times during the daytime hours over the course of the entire season. That number will already be eclipsed this weekend.

“The daytime temperatures are a lot lower this year,” says Code Blue Director Cheryl Ann Murphy-Parant. 

Code Blue was started in December 2013 as a collaborative effort between the City of Saratoga Springs, faith-based groups, individuals and non-profit partners committed to assisting individuals who are homeless. The shelter is temporarily housed at the Soul Saving Station Church, on Henry Street.

Parant said current needs at the shelter include: milk, juices and ice tea mix; butter, sugar and coffee – regular and decaffeinated. Donated items may be dropped off at the shelter at any time.  Additionally, a volunteer sign-up is listed on the organization’s website –https://www.codebluesaratoga.org/wordpress/   - where volunteers may sign up for a variety of duties.

The walk-in, emergency homeless shelter offers a hot meal, a warm and safe place to sleep and essential supplies. During the 2016-17 winter season, Code Blue housed more than 5,800 overnight stays and served 6,700 meals.

Shelters of Saratoga, which oversees Code Blue, had hoped to be operating a permanent shelter adjacent to its S.O.S. properties on Walworth Street this year after local business owner Ed Mitzen announced he would fund the costs to build the shelter and local firms Bonacio Construction and the LA Group agreed to forego any profits to keep the building development costs as low as possible.

Shortly after that announcement, however, a group of 22 residents filed a legal challenge claiming the proposed two-story building which would house about 50 beds didn’t fit into their west side neighborhood and that its development is not a permitted use within the Urban Residential Zoning District. Monday night at City Hall, the Zoning Board of Appeals is expected to discuss the matter. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – One day after being sworn in, the newly elected City Council convened for its first regular Tuesday night meeting at City Hall on Jan. 2. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the newest members of city government - Public Safety Commissioner Peter Martin, Supervisor Tara Gaston and Mayor Meg Kelly, were the first to arrive.

Mayor Kelly – the 21st mayor in the city’s 102-year history and its fourth woman mayor -  made six appointments to three boards: Tom Roohan was appointed chairman of the Saratoga Springs City Center Authority, Stephen “Sully” Sullivan the Authority’s vice-chair and Mark Torpey re-appointment as chairman of the Planning Board, among them.   

Two residents speaking during the meeting’s public comment period. One proposed the council pursue ideas for the development of an indoor recreation facility (despite that one recently was constructed on the city’s south side); another requested specific monetary detail regarding the definition of “affordable housing.”

Finance Commissioner Michele Madigan announced the city received more than 900 property-tax prepayments (380 online and 533 in-person) totaling almost $2.9 million during the final week of the 2017 calendar year. “Hopefully, you’ll be able to take the deduction,” Madigan said. “That’s still to be determined.”

Tuesday night’s meeting ran a total of 32 minutes, which, if not an all-time record for brevity, had to be close to one. We may never see one like it again in our lifetimes.   

This week at the Planning Board:

Spencer Subdivision.  Belmonte Builders is proposing a 22-lot residential cluster subdivision totaling approximately 12.63 acres on property located between Arrowhead Road on the west and Kaydeross Park Road on the east. The proposed lots will vary in size from approximately 10,000 square feet to 16,700 square feet in size. As part of the proposal, approximately 5.2 acres of open space will be created - 1.1 acres located east of the proposed lots along Arrowhead Road and west of the proposed lots on Julians Way, and approximately 4.1 acres located west of Kaydeross Park Road, north of the proposed lot development.  The proposed lots will be served by municipal water from the city - for which new water mains will be provided – and will be served by public sanitary sewer.

Ballston Avenue Townhouses. Ballston Ave. Partners has submitted a sketch plan for discussion regarding a proposed town house development at 96 and 116 Ballston Ave. 

In 2018, U2 will kick off their two-month North American tour in Oklahoma on May 2 and conclude with shows in New York City - at Madison Square Garden June 25, and New Jersey – at the Prudential Center on June 29. Other major artists slated to stage shows in the U.S. this year – although to date none have been scheduled to take place in the immediate Capital Region – include: Jeff Lynne’s ELO; Maroon 5; Foo Fighters; a Pixies and Weezer co-headlining tour; Taylor Swift; Kenny Chesney; Zac Brown Band; Shakira, Alice Cooper, Jethro Tull, and Jackson Browne – to name a few. Whether any of these shows will land locally remains to be seen.  

Concerts currently scheduled to take place in the region in 2018:

Mt. Joy, Jan. 15 @ Hart Theater, Empire State Plaza

Walk The Moon, Jan. 17 @ Upstate Concert Hall

Henry Rollins, Jan. 20 @ The Egg

James Taylor, Jan. 26 @ Times Union Center

Get The Led Out – American Led Zeppelin (tribute), Feb. 3 @Palace Theatre

G3: John Petrucci, Joe Satriani, Phil Collen, Feb. 10 @ Palace Theatre

Three Dog Night, Feb. 11 @ Hart Theatre

Celebrating David Bowie w/ Bernard Fowler, Adrian Belew, Carmine Rojas, Earl Slick and others, Feb. 12 @ The Egg

Next Women of Country w/Sara Evans, RaeLynn, Kalie Shorr, Feb. 15 @ Palace Theatre

Dropkick Murphys, Agnostic Front, Bim Skala Bim, Feb. 25 @ Capital Repertory Theatre

Montgomery Gentry, March 2, @Upstate Concert Hall

Wyclef Jean, March 2 @ Putnam Den.

Rain – A Tribute to the Beatles, March 2 @ Proctors

Shawn Colvin, Lyle Lovett, March 8 @Troy Savings Bank Music Hall

Five for Fighting, March 18, Swyer Theatre

Dixie Dregs, March 21 @ The Egg

Monster Energy Outbreak Tour w/ Jstjr, Kayzo, DJ Gammer, Dubloadz, March 28 @ Upstate Concert Hall

Robin Trower, March 28 @ Hart Theatre

Daughtry, April 7 @ Palace Theatre

They Might Be Giants, April 22 @ The Egg

Dweezil Zappa, April 24 @ The Egg

Alan Jackson, April 28, Times Union Center

Aztec Two-Step, April 28 @ Caffe Lena

Leo Kottke, April 29 @ Swyer Theatre

Yanni, May 13 @ Proctors

Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience, Foreigner, Whitesnake, June 16 @ SPAC

Saratoga Jazz Festival, June 23-24 @ SPAC

Charlie Puth, Hailee Steinfeld, July 22 @ SPAC

 

SARATOGA SPRINGS –  A new spy thriller which includes action scenes that take place at Riley’s Lake House, the United States Hotel and other Saratoga locations in 1940 will celebrate its book launch at Northshire this month.

Lawrence Dudley’s “New York Station” has been hailed by Publisher’s Weekly as a gritty spy thriller featuring “a multifaceted protagonist who’s a refreshing change from formulaic genre,” and by critic Angela Woltman for its “never-ending supply of action, new characters, and puzzling subplots.”

The book launch celebration for Dudley’s “New York Station” will take place 7 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 26.

Also this month at Northshire: poet, memoirist & philanthropist Eileen Rockefeller will read poems from her new collection, “Space Between: Selected Poems,” at 7 p.m. on Jan. 12, and Mary Cuffe Perez will share stories from her new book, “Barn Stories: Reflections from a Saratoga County Horse Farm,” at 7 p.m. on Jan. 27.

 

Events are free and open to the public and will take place at Northshire Bookstore Saratoga, 424 Broadway. For more information on these or other events, call 518-682-4200, or visit the Northshire Bookstore website at www.northshire.com.

Book Launch at Northshire for New Spy Thriller with Saratoga Connections 

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Blotter

  • COURT Temujin V. Bozeman, 60, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced Feb. 7 to 1 year in jail, after pleading to felony DWI.  Mason A. Weber, 25, of Stillwater, pleaded Feb. 6 to felony burglary in Malta. Sentencing is scheduled for  April 10.  Sean D. Knight, 32, of the Bronx, pleaded Feb. 5 to felony DWAI, and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, a misdemeanor. Sentencing scheduled April 9.  Justin P. Rock, 32, of Saratoga Springs, pleaded Feb. 2 to felony burglary. Sentencing scheduled April 13.  Donald P. Gilbert, 22, of Milton, was sentenced Feb. 2 to five years of…

Property Transactions

  • TOWN OF BALLSTON  Lot 17, MacKenna Court, $356,194. John Paul Builders LLC sold property to Thomas and Michele Stamas.  4 Red Barn Dr., $444,853. Barbera Homes Kelley Farms LLC sold property to Gregory and Audrey Michalski.  Scotchbush Rd., $65,000. Charles Morris sold property to William Heflin. 136 Kingsley Rd., $80,000. Shawn and Rory Adair sold property to Rory and Timothy Adair.   CHARLTON 47 Crooked St., $400,000. Glenn Cook (as Trustee) sold property to David Griffiths and Allison Studley Griffiths. 1327 Sacandaga Rd., $249,000. Trustco Realty Corporation sold property to Jennifer and Lucino Venditti, Jr.   CLIFTON PARK 63 Westbury…
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