Thomas Dimopoulos

Thomas Dimopoulos

City Beat and Arts & Entertainment Editor
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SARATOGA SPRINGS — Wednesday’s “Special” City Council meeting lived up to its noteworthy title: so special it was that it never took place.

The meeting was called to discuss funding for the May 30 special election when voters will be asked to decide whether to maintain the status quo of the city’s century-old commission form of governing, or change to a council-manager form.

Following eight months of committee meetings, community surveys and interviews conducted with city employees, the Charter Review Commission - a 15-member group independent of the council - recommended a special election be held on May 30. The group estimates total budget expenses to be about $46,000, in addition to approximately $37,000 in costs associated with a special election. There has been growing disagreement among council members debating the timing and costs of holding a special vote in May, versus placing the issue on an extension of the standard November ballot, which is when all five council seats will also be up for vote. Those in favor of the May date say adding a Charter vote to an already busy city election season would muddle matters. City Mayor Joanne Yepsen and Commissioner Chris Mathiesen were the two lone members attending Wednesday’s meeting, leaving the board one member short of a quorum, and forcing the 17 people and two council members in attendance to leave City Hall without discussing the matter.

Commissioner Anthony “Skip” Scirocco issued a statement following the cancellation of the meeting to say after “it had been indicated that both Commissioner Madigan and Commissioner Franck would not be in attendance,” he also would not be attending. “I feel it only fair that when voting on an important issue that impacts all city residents, and our future as a city, that all members of the council are in attendance.”

Commissioner Michele Madigan said in a statement, that after learning Commissioner John Franck “would not be attending the meeting for professional reasons,” she contacted the mayor’s office to ask the meeting be cancelled because she wanted all five members of the City Council to be present to discuss and vote on the budget amendments from the Charter Review Commission. Some in attendance remarked after the cancelled meeting that council members opposed to a change in the form of governing were using delay tactics.

The City Council has until February 20 to approve the request to fund the Commission’s expenses as well as the special election; if it fails to do so, it is believed the mayor has the ability to approve the amount of funding sought to defray expenses for the Commission’s budget and for the special election.

Under the council-manager form of government, the city council approves the budget, determines the tax rate and focuses on the community’s goals, major projects, and long-term considerations such as community growth, land use development, capital improvement plans, capital financing, and strategic planning. The council would be charged with hiring a highly trained non-partisan, professional city manager to carry out these policies with an emphasis on effective, efficient, and equitable service delivery. Managers serve at the pleasure of the governing body and can be fired by a majority of the council. Among the Commission’s other recommendations are: increasing the number of council members from five to seven and terms of service from two years to four years putting a system in place to ensure members come from all corners of the city, and giving council members confirmation power over all mayoral appointments to city boards and judicial appointments. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the City Council is Feb. 7.

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Ten new buildings, a five-story hotel, more than 400 residential units and nearly 30,000 square feet of retail space may soon rise from the rustic landscape of the city’s west side.

The city’s Land Use boards are evaluating two projects that seek to develop a stretch of vacant land from the south end of the Saratoga Springs train station to Washington Street/ Route 29, and just west of West Avenue.

“You are looking at significant development,” said Bradley Birge, administrator of planning and economic development for Saratoga Springs.

The Station Park project, which would be built out over five phases, calls for two buildings to be dedicated as a mixed-use space with each building housing 36 residential units, and a total of 22,000 square feet of retail space. The 72 residential units would be for-sale condominiums, said Lou Giardino, chief development officer of the project for Top Capital of New York. The Rochester-based firm has secured a purchasing option on the 17 acres of the land where it would develop the $80 million project, if the city grants its approval.  

Additional development would include two buildings - each providing 57 units for senior housing and 33 units for senior assisted care, a 110-to-120 unit five-story hotel and spa, a pool and fitness center, and a free-standing building with an additional 6,200 square feet of retail space. Nearly 600 parking spaces would span across the location to cater to residents, retail workers and shoppers.

The second proposal, submitted by the Missouri-based Vecino Group seeks to develop one three-story building and three four-story buildings to stand just east of the Station Park proposal and near the Washington Street post office. The 160 apartment units contained within seem to fall in the “workforce,” or “affordable” housing categories, although detailed information has yet to be released and phone calls made to the Vecino Group and their local partners at the LA Group that sought comment about the project proposal were not returned.

“They’re two separate and very independent projects coming forward at the same time,” said Birge. “They don’t come as a partnership, but we’ve tried very hard to encourage them to collaborate and at least share their plans (with each other) so that we can approach them in a comprehensive manner.”

“We’ve met with the Vecino Group and support their project,” Giardino said.

According to city officials, two additional firms are also currently readying proposals for further development in the immediate vicinity of the Station Park project, although the size and scope of those two potential projects are not currently known as those plans have yet to be submitted to the city.

The west side build-up is intentional and by design, said city Mayor Joanne Yepsen.

“When we updated our Comprehensive Plan – the first new one in the city in 14 years – we identified West Ave as a growth area, along with Weibel Avenue and South Broadway,” the mayor said. “We’ve also been proactive in looking for a partner who would be involved in affordable housing.” The Vecino Group project would seem to answer some of the city’s affordable housing needs.

The West Avenue corridor has witnessed an increase in development over the past dozen years. In 2004, a $6 million renovation project was conducted at the Saratoga Springs Train Station. Three years later, The YMCA of Saratoga opened its $10 million, 75,000-square-foot community and fitness center 1/4 mile south of the Saratoga Springs Junior-Senior High School. And in 2009, Empire State College completed its Center for Distance Learning facility at its West Avenue property, located a few yards from the college’s graduate studies and international programs building, which was built in 2004. s

SARATOGA SPRINGS —Drawing inspiration from everyone from Bob Dylan to Raymond Chandler, Tom Waits has merged song and monologue into a distorted vaudevillian kaleidoscope for the past 40 years.

This weekend, Michael Eck hosts an evening of Waits’ songs performed by Capital District artists. Show headliner Sean Rowe - known internationally for his powerful original songs and raw baritone voice – will be joined by blues man Mark Tolstrup, literary word-slinger Thomas Dimopoulos, and Elrod, Motherjudge, McWatters - a powerhouse trio assembled specifically for The Heart of Saturday Night. Also performing is Girl Blue - the latest breakout from Albany’s fertile new music scene – who will stage her Caffè Lena debut in advance of her show at New York City’s Bowery Ballroom.

Host Michael Eck will join in with the beautiful maladies, singing between acts. Waits’ gruff voice imagery and roots rock catalog has inspired generations of musicians.

The Waits bio: “By turns tender and poignant, to strange and twisted, his songs tend to explore the dark underbelly of society as he gives his uniquely human voice to adventurers both romantic and mercenary, drifters, con artists and those forgotten characters on the fringe and in the fray.”

The Heart of Saturday Night: Songs of Tom Waits will be staged 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21 at Caffè Lena. Doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Desserts, light fare, FTO coffee, beer & wine will be offered. General Admission is $20, café members: $18, and student/ child: $10. Call 518-583-0022, or go to: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2724524

Friday, 20 January 2017 16:26

Notes from City Hall

Uber in Saratoga Springs Future?

A proposed resolution of the City Council in support of legislation to permit ridesharing companies such as Uber and Lyft to operate locally has been tabled, after it became evident the resolution would not, at this time, have unanimous council support. Commissioners Chris Mathiesen and Michele Madigan expressed concerns about the quality of service that would be provided, and what the long-term effects might be for cab companies currently operating in the city. “I’ve heard a lot of rah-rah stuff about how this will be great for upstate, but I haven’t heard any specifics,” Mathiesen said. Regardless of whether the City Council eventually adopts a resolution, the ultimate decision about whether rideshare companies would be allowed to operate upstate will be made by the state legislature.

This Land Is Your Land, This Land Is My Land

The City Council Tuesday night unanimously approved authorizing the mayor to take steps in executing a property acquisition for the Geyser Road bicycle­pedestrian trail. Up to $80,000 has been appropriated for the purposes of the city to acquire a portion of a handful of different parcels through the power of eminent domain. The two-mile trail runs from the town of Milton/ Saratoga Springs city line, to Route 50. An initial feasibility study regarding the trail was conducted in 2009, and the first public meeting in 2013. Construction is slated to begin this spring, and conclude by the end of the calendar year. One area resident and an attorney representing the Saratoga Spring Water company – both of whom would be affected by the acquisition – respectively raised questions with the council about maintenance and upkeep of the trail, and potential safety issues regarding the development of the trail and delivery truck traffic. By law, the city is required to provide just compensation to the owner(s) of the private property to be taken. Written statements from the public regarding the acquisition will be accepted by Jan. 31, by emailing: Bradley Birge, city administrator of planning & economic development at: bbirge@saratoga-springs-org. Documentation will be returned to the City Council within 90 days for a final decision.

Appointment to Board

Mayor Yepsen appointed Amy Smith, owner of the Saratoga Arms hotel, to the Downtown Special Assessment District Board. Smith’s appointment is through July 2018 and will complete the term of Colleen Holmes, who resigned due to family health reasons. Board members typically serve four-year terms. Additional members of the Downtown Special Assessment District Board include: chairman Harvey Fox, Mariann Barker, Mike Ingersoll, Dean Kolligian, Toby Milde, Ray Morris, Tom Roohan and Rod Sutton.

Upcoming

A new date and time has been set for the mayor’s State of the City Address. The event will take place at 6 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 30 at the Saratoga Springs City Center. The Zoning Board of Appeals will host a meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 23 at City Hall. The Charter Review Commission will host meetings at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 24 and Thursday, Jan. 26 at City Hall. The Planning Board will host a meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26 at City Hall.

 

SARATOGA SPRINGS — If all goes according to plan, city residents will vote in a special election on May 30 that may alter the way Saratoga Springs has been governed since its incorporation as a city in 1915.

Plans call for a ballot providing voters with two options: keep the current City Charter and the commission form of governing as is, or revise the charter with a new form of governing. That proposed new form -  the council-manager form of government, was approved by a 14-0 vote by the Commission late Thursday. 

The Commission has staged meetings and conducted interviews and surveys during the past seven months. Among its recommendations are increasing the number of council members from five to seven, their terms from two years to four years, and putting a system in place to ensure members come from all corners of the city.

“There’s no magic number, but we felt seven was the right number and it’s also the average number of members in councils across the country,” Charter Review Commission chairman Bob Turner told the City Council on Tuesday. Additionally, the proposed four-year terms – similar to approximately 70 percent of city governments in America - would reduce the frequency of fundraising and campaigning, Turner said.

The commission’s lengthiest discussion concerned the merits of neighborhood districts versus at-large elections. Under the current system, commissioners are elected in city-wide elections. Under a neighborhood district system, council members are elected from a neighborhood or smaller geographic area. Candidates would have to live in the district they represent. Neighborhood districts would make a positive contribution to the electoral and governance process of the city, according to the commission. Neighborhood districts would also make it easier for new candidates to run for office since they would only have to reach out to approximately 4,500 voters instead of 18,000. Commission studies indicate that the vast majority of City Council candidates during the past 15 years have come from a small cluster on the central east side of the city, and argue that neighborhood districts would ensure more geographic representation in City Council affairs.

The Commission also supported giving the City Council confirmation power over all mayoral appointments to city boards and judicial appointments pending state law.

The May 30 date is the last Tuesday that a special election can be held while also allowing new candidates to choose to run for the City Council in 2017, based on whether the charter referendum succeeds or fails.

“A special election in May also gives any candidates for public office the full picture of what the voters want for their form of government, one way or the other,” said commission member Gordon Boyd, in a statement.

What is the Council-Manager Form of Government?

Under the council-manager form of government, the city council approves the budget, determines the tax rate and focuses on the community’s goals, major projects, and such long-term considerations as community growth, land use development, capital improvement plans, capital financing, and strategic planning.  The council hires a highly trained non-partisan, professional city manager to carry out these policies with an emphasis on effective, efficient, and equitable service delivery. Managers serve at the pleasure of the governing body and can be fired by a majority of the council.

 

The council-manager form is the most popular structure of local government in the United States.  Among cities with a 25,000-49,999 population, 63 percent of cities have a council manager structure, 31 percent have mayor council, and 1% has the commission form of government. Currently, Saratoga Springs and Mechanicville are the only cities in New York that have the commission form of government, according to the Commission. 

Pat Kane, vice-chairman of the 15-member citizen board, said he anticipates total costs to be about $46,000 - $20,000 for legal drafting costs, $20,000 for community information outreach, and about $6,000 in clerical support expense. Additionally, a special election would cost $37,000. There has been push-back among some current council members regarding the timing and the expense of a special election. Specifically, Commissioner John Franck contends that residents will be less likely to make the effort to vote in a special election than they would be in a more traditionally timed vote in November. Commissioner Chris Mathiesen countered that in November all five current council seats will be up for re-election and that adding a charter review vote would only serve to complicate matters and not allow the issue the appropriate focus it deserves.

The council has until late February to approve the request to fund the Commission’s expenses as well as the special election; if it fails to do so, it is believed the mayor has the ability to approve the amount of funding sought. Representatives of the Charter Commission met with members of the city finance department Wednesday, and it is anticipated the council will discuss the funding requests in the near future. The council’s next regularly scheduled meeting is Feb. 7, although a “special” council meeting to specifically discuss the matter may be called for prior to that date.

SARATOGA — A letter from the NYS Police Pistol Permit Bureau mailed to gun owners and reminding them of requirements to recertify their licenses every five years has triggered a defiant response from Saratoga County Sheriff Michael Zurlo, who said he will not have his deputies enforce the SAFE Act provision by “harassing already law-abiding citizens.”

The Pistol Permit Bureau’s letter informs gun owners that if a permit was issued prior to Jan. 15, 2013, the deadline to submit recertification is Jan. 31, 2018. “I will not commit resources by taking deputies off the street to enforce this SAFE Act provision when our deputies have important work to do keeping our communities a safe place to live, work and raise families,” Zurlo said, in a statement. “The purpose of the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office is to serve and protect the residents of this county, not to harass already law-abiding citizens with the SAFE Act’s Pistol Permit recertification provisions.”

A similar sentiment was echoed by fellow Republican County Clerk Hayner. “Recertification is creating another undue burden to law-abiding pistol permit holders who have invested time and resources obtaining their pistol permit license here in Saratoga County,” Hayner said.

“I’m really surprised (Zurlo) would say something like that, because his job is to enforce the law, said Patricia Tuz, Capital Region Coordinator for New Yorkers’ Against Gun Violence, a nonprofit organization with a mission to reduce gun violence through legislative advocacy and education. “But, he is an elected official and sometimes elected officials say things they believe their constituents want to hear, and then later they reconsider,” Tuz said. “So, I hope he reconsiders.”

The NY SAFE Act, signed into law by Gov. Cuomo in January 2013 in the weeks following the shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, amended state law to include an expanded ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, as well as requirements for background checks. Safeguards included requiring those with existing pistol permits to renew or recertify permits every five years. One year later, the Saratoga County Sheriff and County Clerk worked with the county Board of Supervisors to pass a resolution prohibiting New York State from using the Saratoga County Seal for SAFE Act purposes.

A series of statewide polls conducted by Siena College over a two-year period indicates an average of about 60 percent of respondents support the Safe Act, approximately 33 percent are opposed, and the balance have no opinion on the matter. Regionally, the measure garners more support in the New York City area, than in upstate. “Views on the SAFE Act have remained largely unchanged over time. It has the support of more than three quarters of Democrats and New York City voters and a strong majority of independents and downstate suburbanites. Upstaters are closely divided, with a bare majority opposed and Republicans are strongly opposed,” Siena College pollster Steven Greenberg said in 2015.

Gun owners may recertify pistol permits and check their recertification status on the State Police website at: https://firearms.troopers.ny.gov/pprecert/welcome.faces.

The state police have made it very easy to re-certify with an online form,” Tuz said. “It’s like having a driver’s license, where you have to renew it every few years. It’s a privilege to own a gun, just like it’s a privilege to drive a car.”

A spokesman for the State Police said no comment would be made in response to Zurlo’s statement.

SARATOGA SPRINGS — The 18-year-old was between classes and walking through the halls of her high school last week when the actions of a fellow student jarred her into consciousness. “A kid from one of my classes, who I don’t even really know did the Nazi salute. I stopped and looked at him and didn’t even know what to say,” said senior class student Channah Goldman.

She continued walking, to the school library, where she sat at a desk, took out her books and looked down at the series of symbols carved into the desk top. “There were swastikas all over the desk,” said the student, who has visited concentration camps overseas and has seen the fingernail scratches on the chamber walls of victims who were killed. “I felt physically ill and moved to another desk. And there was another one.”

Goldman said a librarian was apologetic and immediately set to the task of cleaning the desks. The student’s captured images show carvings embedded so deeply the desks required a sanding-over and new artwork drawn atop them to obfuscate the hate symbols. Both the incidents were brought to the attention of the school, and it appears they are being resolved internally, according to Goldman, but when her 14-year-old brother, who is also a student in the school district, noticed an Instagram account which appears to represent “Saratoga High School Fourth Reich,” and referenced neo-Nazis, the police got involved.

“My brother came across it and showed it to me,” Goldman said. “He showed it to my family and everyone was really concerned. The school started looking into it and taking it seriously.”

“When we first learned of the Instagram Account, we were involved from the get-go,” said city Police Lt. Robert Jillson. “At this point, we haven’t deciphered the creator of the account, but we did go in and interview in excess of 30 students who followed the account.” The city police department has a school resource officer, or SRO, who works at the school full-time. Investigators determined that students who had opted to follow the account did so based on the name recognition of their high school, but had not delved deeper into the account to learn of its neo-Nazi references. “The intention of the people who created the account, that could be concerning, and we’d like to know and the school would like to know the intention behind it,” Lt. Jillson said.

Swastika graffiti has recently been discovered in at least two locations in the city – near the Caroline Street elementary school and on the Spring Run Trail, as well as other places in the region. The anti-Semitic acts are not new, internationally, or regionally. One hundred and forty years ago, Joseph Seligman, an American banker and financial advisor to the administrations of Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant, was famously said to have been barred from staying at the fabled Grand Union Hotel in Saratoga Springs because the hotel’s owner, Judge Henry Hilton, insisted that Jews be excluded from the hotel. According to historian Lee Livney, the “Hilton-Seligman Affair” was featured and editorialized in newspapers coast-to-coast at the time, and has come to be known as a focal point of the origins of American anti-Semitism.

A letter penned by Michael Piccirillo, Superintendent of Saratoga Springs Schools, on Wednesday informed members of the school community about the Instagram account.

“I wish to make clear that the views expressed on this site (SHS4R) are not representative of the school district’s beliefs nor are they authorized in any way or representative of any club or activity associated with the school district. The Saratoga Springs City School District denounces any speech which promotes acts of hatred or violence against any individual or group,” Piccirillo said. “The SHS4R page directly refers to a site that espouses white supremacy and anti-Semitic rhetoric. In addition, the moniker SHS4R inappropriately and without any permission directly relates the name of our high school to concepts expressed by Nazi Germany.” The letter concludes: “It is incumbent upon us to take an active role in exposing intolerance and teaching our children to celebrate diversity as a strength. We ask all parents to speak with their own children about such ideals and encourage the same diversity and inclusiveness we promote at school. Together we can strengthen our culture and build a strong foundation supported by acceptance and the celebration of our diversity.” Piccirillo was away from the office mid-week and unavailable for direct comment, according to a school spokesperson.

“This is not new and it’s not specific just to the Saratoga School District, but the urgency in which they reacted is commendable,” said Goldman’s mother, Kelly Hillis. “I cannot be more satisfied with what the school did. They could’ve kept it quiet but chose to bring it out into the light and make it a learning opportunity. As far as the kid giving the Nazi salute, the kid was spoken to the next day. With the swastikas, I immediately spoke to someone at the school and within 24 hours someone at the school called me to apologize,” said Hillis, who added she believes the hateful symbols were carved into desks by kids who don’t know any better and that the school can only do so much. A large part of the responsibility of teaching acceptance for, and the beauty of diversity takes place in the home between parents and children, she said. “They haven’t been taught that the symbols are hateful symbols.

“My hope is by bringing this into the light, other kids will say: hey, here’s a kid in my school. She’s my friend. She’s one of us, and look how others are making her feel bad. Just to bring that home,” she said. “Just to bring that home.”

Friday, 06 January 2017 16:12

Notes from City Hall

Moody’s Investors Service Upgrades City’s Outstanding Bonds Rating Commissioner of Finance Michele Madigan announced this week that Moody’s Investors Service has upgraded the City’s bond rating on its outstanding bonds from Aa3 to Aa2. The city has $52.5 million in general obligation bonds outstanding. This is comparable to the AA+ awarded by Standard and Poor’s (S&P) for each of the past five years, all during Madigan’s tenure, the commissioner said. The revised rating reflects “the city’s strong fiscal management as evidenced by recent consecutive years of surplus operations, strong reserve levels, conservative budgeting, and consistent operating surpluses,” according to Moody’s. “The city’s healthy financial position will likely remain stable.” In outlining credit challenges Moody’s noted that the city should look to “additional revenue sources needed to augment eventual elimination of VLT aid”, and noted the city has a “reliance on economically sensitive revenues.” UDO Advisory Committee Announces Series of Public Meetings at Music Hall The Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Technical Review Advisory Committee (TRAC) will host a series of meetings, open to the public, at the Saratoga Music Hall through the spring. Similar to City Council meetings – although earlier in the day - the UDO gatherings will take place the first and third Tuesday of the month, beginning on Jan. 17. According to the city, the UDO is a tool which combines traditional zoning and subdivision regulations into one, easy-to-read reference document. It is intended to eliminate redundant or conflicting code provisions, and help to streamline the review and approval process and clarify the steps and requirements with clear illustrations and language. The city began work on a UDO 12 months ago. The goals of the project are to update existing zoning and subdivision regulations to be in conformance with the newly-adopted Comprehensive Plan; to research and implement new initiatives which would improve the overall sustainability of the city with regards to energy consumption, stormwater management, solar power, walkability and similar measures, and to combine and reformat various development standards into one, single unified document which is easy to read and understand, with improved efficiency and a more streamlined review and approval process. The project is funded by a Cleaner, Greener Communities grant provided by NYSERDA. The TRAC provides the technical input to carry out the continuing, cooperative and comprehensive planning process for the UDO. Meetings will take place 4 to 6 p.m. on Jan. 17, Feb. 7, Feb. 21, March 7, March 21, April 4 and April 18. Upcoming Meetings The Zoning Board of Appeals will host a public meeting at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 9 at City Hall. New business to be discussed includes: Subdivision - 58 Fifth Ave. area variance for a two-lot subdivision; Garage - 111 Catherine St. area variance to finish the interior of an existing garage; Residence - 101 North Street, area variance for additions to an existing single-family residence; Two-Family - 63 Ash St. area variance to construct a detached garage/dwelling unit; Two-Family - 217 Caroline St. area variance for an addition to an existing multi-family residence. Old Business: The Springs Signs - 60 and 74 Weibel Avenue, area variance for additions to two existing freestanding signs. The Saratoga Springs Board of Ethics will meet at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 12 at City Hall. The Planning Board will host a meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 12 at City Hall.
Friday, 06 January 2017 15:49

Changes for City Government in 2017

SARATOGA SPRINGS — From the development of new hotels and the construction of parking garages, to addressing affordable housing issues and the daily recreational activities of year-round residents, most everything that happens in Saratoga Springs passes through City Hall. Historical significance aside, the 146-year-old brick building on Broadway houses a variety of review commissions and advisory boards, each with their own specialty which feed their recommendations to the ultimate governing body that is the City Council. The five-member council – comprised of the mayor and four commissioners are each tasked with overseeing different city departments, as well as sharing equal voting power at the table when deciding how to shape the city’s future. The councilmembers each serve two-year terms, and all five seats will be up in the November 2017 election. Prior to that vote, however, the city’s commission form of governing may face a challenge in a public referendum that could take place as soon as the spring. “We had a vote 12-3 to draft a charter with an alternative form of government,” Bob Turner, chairman of the Charter Review Commission told the City Council this week. “However, we’ll also be making suggestions on changes to the current form.” At least one sitting councilmember is publicly opposed to a springtime referendum. “Having a special election in April is ludicrous. It’s almost like you’re trying to shoehorn this thing in,” DPW Commissioner Anthony “Skip” Scirocco said this week. “If you have special elections mid-term, you just don’t get the turn-out. Special interest and special groups come out. It would make a lot more sense, to me, to wait and have that election in November.” The annual State of the City address, during which Mayor Joanne Yepsen will discuss the city’s achievements during the past 12 months and its plans the future, will take place 10 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 28 at the Saratoga Springs City Center. The State of The City address provides a roadmap of the city’s agenda for the new year, as well as offering a glimpse of what may be in the works behind the scenes. It was during the 2015 address that the formation of the arts commission, and the subsequent policies regulating street performers emerged for the first time. “As we move forward in our second century as a city, we must sustain our growth without compromising our city in the country,” Yepsen said in last year’s address. Land Use and environmental protection were among the priorities in the 2016 vision. Building economic opportunities and housing initiatives were the others, and these are sure to continue well into the future. City Land Use Boards The Saratoga Springs Planning Board is a seven-member citizen board appointed by the mayor to 7-year staggered terms. The Planning Board reviews development activities within city boundaries and provides advisory services to the City Council, Zoning Board of Appeals, and Design Review Commission on various development activity, and meets 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month. This week, Mayor Joanne Yepsen appointed Amy Durland to a one-year term, to fulfill the final year of obligation by board member Howard Pinsley, who resigned due to health reasons. The Saratoga Springs Zoning Board of Appeals is a quasi-judicial seven-member citizen board appointed by the Mayor to 7-year staggered terms. The ZBA reviews requests for waivers from regulations in the zoning ordinance, including Use Variances, Area Variances, and requests for interpretation of the regulations made by the city’s Zoning Enforcement Officer. The Board also makes referrals for advisory opinions on any matter before the Board to the City Council, the Planning Board, and the Design Review Commission. This week, Mayor Joanne Yepsen appointed Cheryl Grey to a 7-year term. The Saratoga Springs Design Review Commission is a 7-member citizen board appointed by the Mayor to 5-year staggered terms. The DRC has jurisdiction over signage and exterior building changes on most properties within the city’s National Register Districts, as well as over signage and exterior building changes on properties that face the major entrance roads to the city. The Commission also provides advisory services to the City Council, Zoning Board of Appeals, and Planning Board on various development activity. Mayor Appoints Second City Court Judge – Vero In, Doern Out Mayor Joanne Yepsen appointed Francine R. Vero to fill the second position of full-time City Court Judge. Vero, a Democrat, will serve for a period of one year, commencing Jan. 1, 2017. Under a bill signed in 2013 by Gov. Andrew Cuomo that seeks to ease caseloads in overburdened municipal courts, Saratoga Springs maintained its one full-time judge - Democrat Jeffery Wait - who was originally elected to the judgeship in 2008, and transformed its one part-time city judgeship - held by Republican Jim Doern, into a full-time position. Yepsen recently appointed Wait to fill the first position within City Court, and with the appointment of Vero - a 2006 graduate of Albany Law School and a Senior Counsel with the Harris Beach law firm – Doern’s service to the city as judge has concluded, although he could mount a political challenge for the seat in the fall. The position will be open for local elective office in the November 2017 vote. John Safford, a Republican mayoral candidate who challenged the Democrat Yepsen in the 2015 election, this week questioned Yepsen’s appointment of Vero over Doern. “I’m very confident and very happy with my choice,” Yepsen responded. “We all need to move on and keep the politics out of it.” In addition to increasing staffing requirements, the state Office of Court Administration also informed the city it would need to modify its existing court space, which sits directly beneath Saratoga Music Hall, to accommodate the second judge -- and that it must do so at its own expense. Last May, the City Council held a special meeting and unanimously backed an option which calls for the conversion of Saratoga Music Hall into courtroom space. The proposed conversion of the hall has been an unpopular one within some residents of the city, who cite its historic construction and its value as a 300-seat performance hall. At a public hearing last May, nearly two dozen people spoke for nearly an hour to protest the council’s decision to turn the hall into courtroom space, and an online petition titled “Save the Music Hall!” garnered more than 370 signatures in three weeks. Re-construction of the hall has yet to commence.
Friday, 06 January 2017 15:41

In The Neighborhood

Ray O’Conor, author of the book, “She Called Him Raymond: A True Story of Love, Loss, Faith and Healing,” dons his “smart glasses” at a worktable inside the Saratoga Springs Public Library, where he is flanked by a laptop computer, a pair of three-inch binders and a trusty thermos. “Today I’m working on a section of the screenplay that involves the occasion on which Helen – who is my mother, and one of the two main characters in the story - and Raymond, the aspiring young aviator she meets by chance in New York, are going to her mother’s tenement apartment in Hell’s Kitchen so he can ask for her hand in marriage. “The reason I got the notion to do this is I’ve been doing a lot of reading presentations of the book and almost without exception someone in every audience says, ‘I love the story. I think it would make a great movie.’” O’Conor goes through some notes provided him by his friend Scott McCloud, a retired former head of the English Department at Ballston Spa High School, and who is one of a dozen or so people who have offered to read through the screenplay and offer suggestions. “I spoke to some people in the film business in Hollywood. No one has optioned the story yet but there was enough interest to encourage me to undertake writing the screenplay. It probably will take a couple of years. I’ve been working on it since about this time last year.” O’Conor is also a multi-tasker of words and story ideas. “I’m working on another book: the story of the guide who took my friends and I to climb to Mt. Killimanjaro in Tanzania a little more than four years ago. The man has an extraordinary story. His name is Protus Mayunga and he lives in the Catskills now with his wife and his five kids. I’d like to take another trip to Africa with him to visit the town he grew up in. I want to take my time with the story, to make sure it’s done right.”
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Blotter

  • COURTS Gregory L. Lyons, 58, of Gansevoort, was sentenced on March 15 to five years of probation, after pleading to felony DWI. Fred F. Albright III, 35, of Saratoga Springs, pleaded on March 15 to felony DWI. Sentencing scheduled for May 10. James R. Wright, Jr., 26, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced on March 15 to one year in Saratoga County Jail, after pleading to felony DWI. Craig L. Johnson, 54, of Schenectady, was sentenced on March 15 to 4 years in state prison and 1.5 years post-release supervision after pleading to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the…

Property Transactions

  • BALLSTON SPA 4 Harvester Way, $417,930. Legacy Custom Homes LLC sold property to Legacy Custom Homes LLC. 33 Forest Rd., $220,000. Louis Hoebel sold property to Michael Turgeon and Cynthia Thomas-Turgeon. 412 Goode St., $190,000. Charles Sammons sold property to Geoffry and Karley Hoffman. 8 America Way, $412,391. Briarwood Brooks Development LLC sold property to Joshua Terranova. 76 Church Ave., $180,000. Jean Dahlgren sold property to Scott, Rosemary and Avrum Tabachneck. GREENFIELD 3483 Boyhaven Rd., $79,900. Donald Sanders and Joyce Caver sold property to Geoffrey and Jillian Jones. 342 Middle Grove Road, $95,000. Thomas Merrills, Jr. sold property to Joyce…
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