Larry Goodwin

Larry Goodwin

News & Business Reporter, Editor
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Death Wish Coffee Co. Owner Mike Brown answers questions from local veterans; and Nick Casey (as Santa Claus) and Stillwater Supervisor Ed Kinowski at Saratoga Coffee Traders. Photos by Larry Goodwin. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – This week, local military veterans shared holiday cheer as they celebrated the one-year anniversary of a social event held every Tuesday at Saratoga Coffee Traders, specifically for them to make new friends. 

Amy Hughes, program coordinator for the Veterans Peer Connection in Ballston Spa, first organized the coffee meet-up in early November 2016. In the course of almost 60 weeks it was canceled only one Tuesday due to bad weather. “We had ice,” she said. 

Hughes said 15 or 20 veterans regularly show up between 5 and 7 p.m. each week to mingle at the coffee shop, located at 447 Broadway. On the Tuesday before Christmas, though, a boisterous crowd of 30 veterans filled the small back room for the occasion.

Stillwater Supervisor Ed Kinowski, chairman of the Saratoga County Board of Supervisors and a veteran himself after 38 years of service in the U.S. Air Force and Air National Guard, was in attendance with his wife.

Also invited was Death Wish Coffee Company owner Mike Brown, who explained to the crowd that he opened Saratoga Coffee Traders in 2008 before developing his own unique vision for the coffee industry. The veterans applauded his company’s success.  

“We do love your coffee,” one man confessed.

Afterward, Brown said it surprised him “how big this is,” noting how Death Wish Coffee Co. offers discounted products to military veterans and strongly supports local firefighters and law enforcement—whose members are often veterans, too.  

“This means more than you can really put into words,” offered Nick Casey in his Santa Claus costume. He served in the Air National Guard and met Kinowski during that time.

Casey described the coffee meet-ups on Broadway as “vets for vets,” noting how in the early weeks only two or three people attended. 

“I came looking for help and now I’m helping,” he said, after making his rounds with hearty exclamations of “ho-ho-ho.” 

Will Ryan, who served in the U.S. Army for eight years, explained how Hughes connects individual veterans in an ongoing mentorship program. He said mentors offer to help struggling veterans with trips to grocery stores, the filing of paperwork for healthcare at the Veterans Administration, or whatever they need.

“I volunteered for the military. I love to serve,” Ryan said. “I wanted to work with veterans, so this is what I found. It just made sense that I would come here to Amy’s program.”

Tory Landry reported that he has served in the National Guard for 19 years, and now works out of the Watervliet Arsenal. He has attended all of the coffee meet-ups in Saratoga Springs, while serving as a mentor for veterans who are deemed “high risk.”

Landry routinely meets with incarcerated veterans at the Saratoga County jail.

“Nobody wants to ask for help,” Landry observed. Veterans “join the military, they succeed in that aspect, so asking for help is tough to do.” But the mentors, he added, can help to “open a dialogue.”

“Saratoga County seems to be very good at establishing that core support foundation…to allow all these events to happen,” Landry said. 

The Veterans Peer Connection, a Saratoga County agency supported through New York State grant funds, pays the tab every Tuesday at Saratoga Coffee Traders.

The agency organizes numerous activities throughout the year as well. It has scheduled a free event for veterans on Thursday, Jan. 18 at The Comedy Works, located at 388 Broadway.

Sandy Arnold, who served in the U.S. Army and Reserves for more than 20 years, sat at a table Tuesday night with several more women veterans. She praised the coffee meet-ups arranged by Hughes and the role of Veterans Peer Connection in general.

“It’s really nice. I’ve made a lot of real friends,” Arnold said. “We’re there for each other.”

For more information, call 518-884-4999 or visit the website https://veteranspeertopeer.org/.

 

WILTON – Town residents will have a chance early next month to address the need for a special drainage district in relation to the proposed Canyon Run Extension housing project on Gailor Road. 

At its Dec. 7 meeting, the Wilton Town Board set the related public hearing for 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 4 in the town complex. The board has authority to approve the creation of such localized taxing districts.

Last year, the 44-lot housing proposal on almost 40 acres—part of the existing Canyon Run development near the Adirondack Northway—already had received preliminary approval by the Wilton Planning Board.

But among the “contingencies” that needed to be satisfied was proper surface drainage, according to Planning Board Executive Secretary Lucy Harlow.  

At a cost estimated in the hundreds of thousands, developer Daniel Galusha is expected to pay for installing a drainage system at Canyon Run Extension. Town officials would be required to inspect that installation process from start to finish.    

Subsequently, residents in the new Canyon Run Extension homes would be required to pay a special tax related to the long-term maintenance of the drainage district.

The minutes of a May 18, 2016 public hearing quoted Tawny Terrace resident Brigitte Giacchetta, who directly addressed the subject in an email to the planning board.

“I do have some concerns regarding this proposal,” Giacchetta said. “My first concern is drainage. The area is very wet and since I have a drainage swale through the back of my property I am worried about the additional water flow and where it's going to go.”

Giacchetta cited a number of other concerns in her email, echoing comments made by several residents at the public hearing.  

“The construction will bring traffic, heavy machinery, and people speeding down Gailor road,” she predicted.

Wilton Planning Board Chairman Michael Dobis assured the residents who spoke that town officials would “consider all the comments and questions” received, according to the official minutes. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – City entrepreneur Drew West admitted this week that he fully understood how it would be “a daunting task to go against a behemoth” like eBay Inc. in court.

Still, he said, “I couldn’t walk away from righting the wrong.”

Early this year, West, the owner of American Natural Gas on Railroad Place, partnered with his father, Albany attorney Thomas West, in filing a lawsuit against eBay in Saratoga Supreme Court for breach of contract and unjust enrichment, among several other claims.

Lawyers for eBay, based in San Jose, California, later petitioned to have the case moved to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York in Albany. 

On Friday, Dec. 1, a motion by eBay to dismiss the lawsuit was denied by U.S. District Judge Mae A. D'Agostino. The Wests are seeking $25 million.  

Cory Daniel Struble, a New York City attorney representing eBay for the national law firm Quinn Emanuel, deferred comment to California attorney David Grable with the same firm. Grable did not return a call for comment. 

The pending lawsuit relates to communications that occurred several years ago between Drew West and eBay executives; and the contested use of “an internet auction valet,” as described in the judge’s decision, “a service that simplifies the process for sellers on virtual marketplaces.”

Drew West has found financial success in such “valet” services for 20 years, D’Agostino explained. West and eBay first reached an agreement to collaborate in 2007 and the company formally hired him as a consultant in 2011, she added.   

The lawsuit alleges that, by October 2014, eBay executives were taking commercial advantage of a “business plan” that West had previously presented to them without his consent, according to D’Agostino’s decision.

“It was a simple contract case,” explained Thomas West, noting how eBay executives were “fascinated” by his son’s ideas as well as his “knack for moving merchandise.”

Thomas West said the legal victory on Dec. 1—in which all four claims made “survived” eBay’s motion to dismiss—allows the “discovery” phase of the legal process to begin and a potential trial by jury, during which both men say they will be vindicated.

“I think the merits are there,” added Drew West. “We’re just looking for our day in court.”   

 

Cliff Seguin with the ruins of his Operation Adopt A Soldier storage shed. Photos by www.photoandgraphic.com

WILTON – Cliff Seguin said that he will not let the destruction of monsters, fog machines and other props interrupt his nonprofit group’s mission of lifting the spirits of U.S. soldiers during the holidays. 

A storage shed owned by Seguin’s Operation Adopt A Soldier, situated near Gavin Park, was destroyed in a fire on Sunday. It was being used to store electronics and props valued at about $3,000, which the group utilizes for haunted hayrides given in the park each autumn.  

“We’re going to come out of this stronger than we were,” offered Seguin, when contacted this week for comment. He said the shed was not covered by insurance.

Lt. Jeff Brown of the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office said there was no “cause” found in the ruins of the storage shed, which did not have electric service.

“It’s definitely a suspicious fire,” Brown said. “We’re investigating it as an arson.”

Seguin, who founded Operation Adopt A Soldier in 2004 along with Dominick Commisso, explained that the group’s volunteers are in the midst of sending hundreds of holiday packages to active-duty military personnel and would not be deterred by the blaze.

“We’re doing it all for the soldiers,” he said.

For more information, visit the website www.operationadoptasoldier.org/about-us

Matt Jones in his West Avenue office. Photos by www.photoandgraphic.com; and a rendering of the proposed Red Pine Grove complex in Malta, provided by The Jones Firm.  

MALTA – The real-estate firm that is currently building 140 residential units at the intersection of East Line Road and Route 67 in Ballston is advancing a separate proposal with Malta town officials, involving 15 acres of property located off of Route 9 between Ellsworth Commons and Cramer Road. 

Previously, town officials had approved plans for the Malta Crossings development on the same land, which included a hotel and residential units.  

Conifer Realty, a Rochester-based company, has renamed its new proposal as the Red Pine Grove complex.

The property would be subdivided into two separate parcels of about two and 13 acres. The larger parcel would be mostly residential, and Conifer Realty currently has no plans to develop the smaller one near Route 9 due to the presence of archeological remains.

Matt Jones, the Saratoga Springs attorney representing Conifer Realty, said Red Pine Grove will be the “only workforce housing development in Malta,” similar to the firm’s Blue Heron Trail complex going up a few minutes west in the Town of Ballston.

Conifer Realty’s proposal in Malta calls for 12 three-story apartment buildings with a total of nearly 100 units; and a three-story “senior housing” structure close to Route 9 with 70 units, according to minutes of the June 20 Malta Planning Board meeting.

The firm also will build a senior clubhouse, a separate clubhouse for families, a maintenance garage, a sewer-pump station, and a storm water treatment area. 

There will be a 144-foot “buffer” of trees to lessen any visual impacts on homeowners in the existing Cramer Woods neighborhood, according to the planning board. 

In November, Jones and his associates appeared before the Malta Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) to request variances for eight-foot ceiling heights on upper floors of the senior building; and an increase in that building’s frontage length to more than 227 feet.

Both requests were denied by the ZBA, since Malta town code specifies nine-foot ceilings and a maximum frontage of only 120 feet. 

The planning board is expected to consider Conifer Realty’s amended design plans again at a meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 19 in the town complex.

Jones said the firm is reviewing engineering aspects of the project and would submit a final site plan to the planning board for approval no sooner than January. Construction is expected to start in summer 2018, he added. 

On Wednesday, though not required by town planners, a public forum was organized by Conifer Realty to hear concerns from local residents about the Red Pine Grove project. It was held at a similar property owned by the firm on Waite Road in Rexford.

Jones said a number of neighbors’ concerns were identified and that Conifer Realty planners will consider them as the proposal moves forward.

Mary Mahoney, a retired state worker and Luther Forest resident for 30 years, addressed the Malta Town Board on Monday, Dec. 4 after being granted the opportunity to do so by Supervisor Vincent DeLucia.

She criticized town officials for even considering the Red Pine Grove project and, in general, approving so much construction.

“We need housing,” Mahoney admitted, but added that the town also needs more “bus service” and “social planning.”

Many residents in Malta, Mahoney told the board, think town officials favor the profit motives of developers over the needs of long-term residents, without regard for proper planning, traffic impacts or light and sound pollution.

Most recent construction projects, she added, end up looking like “barracks” filled with people who “live on batteries.”

When DeLucia politely requested that Mahoney conclude her comments, she inspired a few chuckles in the room, saying: “I won’t bother you anymore on this subject if you change your evil ways.”

Thursday, 07 December 2017 21:45

Pearl Harbor Attack Remembered

Saratoga Springs Mayor Joanne Yepsen joined Heather Mabee (center) and other members of the Daughters of the American Revolution for a memorial ceremony at the Congress Park War Memorial on Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. Photo by Larry Goodwin. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – With a December chill in the morning air, members of the Daughters of the American Revolution gathered Thursday at the Congress Park War Memorial for an annual wreath-laying ceremony—at the precise moment in 1941 that Japanese fighter planes had begun a devastating attack on the U.S. Navy base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

“This is important, to remember this day,” explained Heather Mabee, a principal organizer of the event and the local Daughters of the American Revolution chapter.

As of July 2017, nearly 76 years after that fateful morning thrust the United States into World War II, Mabee reported that there were still a handful of survivors who served on the USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor. “The ship was most heavily hit in the raid,” she said, reading from a prepared statement.

The surprise Japanese attack, which started at 7:55 a.m., damaged or destroyed 20 U.S. ships and 300 aircraft; it also claimed the lives of more than 2,400 U.S. military personnel and civilians, while injuring almost 1,200 individuals.  

“More than seven decades after President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared Dec. 7, 1941 as ‘a date which will live in infamy,’ tangible proof of the day’s events are still visible at Pearl Harbor,” Mabee continued. “Machine-gun strafing holes from Imperial Japanese fighter planes still dot the now-unused runway at Ford Island and airplane hangars at Hickam Air Force Base. Oil, sometimes called ‘black tears,’ still seeps up from the sunken USS Arizona, beading the surface of the water at the battleship’s memorial.”

Similar wreath-laying ceremonies are held nationwide each December, Mabee said, to recognize the U.S. Navy ships and people lost at various battle sites in Pearl Harbor.

Professor Andrew Corbett. Photo provided. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Modern technology definitely helps Andrew Corbett, PhD, to maintain his notable reputation at Babson College in Massachusetts.

Typically, from Labor Day through early May, the Saratoga Springs resident serves as the Paul T. Babson Chair of Entrepreneurship at the college, located near Boston, as well as the chair of its Entrepreneurship Division.

In an email this week describing his travel routine, Professor Corbett said he either commutes on the Massachusetts Turnpike “once or twice” each week during academic semesters at Babson; or he utilizes “digital assets,” often by teaching courses online in “the comfort of my attic office right here in downtown Saratoga.”  

Previously, Corbett taught aspiring business owners for about a decade at the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy.

Brianna Radicioni, the spokeswoman for Babson College, issued a statement recently describing how Corbett had received a positive recognition in an academic journal for the overall usefulness of his research. “Yes, he makes that drive all the time,” she confirmed.  

The Journal of Small Business Management, in a September study titled “Contributing Forces in Entrepreneurship Research: A Global Citation Analysis,” had named Corbett among a list of the “Top 25 Entrepreneurship Researchers in the World.”

“The study performed an analysis of all entrepreneurship articles published in leading entrepreneurship and management outlets from 2002 to 2013,” explained Radicioni. “It calculated the volume of work done by professors around the world together with each article’s citation impact (a measure that shows how much a researcher’s work is used by other scholars, entrepreneurs and practicing managers). The study concludes that Corbett ranks 20th in entrepreneurship research impact globally.”  

“As a research scholar, Andrew Corbett continually creates impact above and beyond his role as chair, professor and mentor to Babson’s Butler Launchpad accelerator,” offered Babson College Dean of Faculty Bala Iyer. “This global recognition as one of the top 25 contributing authors to entrepreneurship research is well-deserved—one that brings great pride to the entire Babson community, especially its Entrepreneurship Division.”

Aside from the significance of his achievement, Corbett was asked how his work at Babson applies to Saratoga County residents who plan to start their own businesses.

“One thing that we can learn from the canon of entrepreneurship research is that many of the myths people hold are just not true,” he said. “The United States is a country built upon a strong work ethic and the concept of rugged individualism. But that concept of individualism sometimes gets stretched a bit too far in the popular and mainstream press.

“So we see stories on Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk of Tesla, Bill Gates, or Oprah and they are seen as Superman or Superwoman. And, obviously, that is not true,” Corbett added. “The myth of the single, super-entrepreneur is just not accurate.”

Corbett calls Saratoga Springs “a wonderful example of some of my work examining entrepreneurial ecosystems: a system of businesses and institutions that co-exist and co-evolve for betterment of all.”

The “anchor” businesses in the area, such as Saratoga Hospital, Skidmore College and SPAC, combined with the more recent presence of GlobalFoundries, all serve to “create more opportunities,” according to Corbett.  

Corbett says his “methodology” proposes that “anybody can be an entrepreneur” with a proper focus on basic realities. “What do you know? Who do you know? What are you interested in?” he advises. “Don’t follow the latest trends or hottest industries, per se, but follow your interests and abilities.

“Think about it as testing your hypothesis with some first potential customers,” he said. “Small steps, small actions. Learn and readjust. It is an act, learn and build model.” 

While Corbett sees “a growing opportunity for businesses that can help serve the semiconductor industry,” local entrepreneurs also may find success in technology, design, analytics and advertising, he said, “particularly in the medical area.”

Corbett singled out Fingerpaint on Broadway, noting how “anchors like those both create and attract superior individual talent that often can spin-off on their own to fulfill other growth needs.”   

Thursday, 30 November 2017 21:46

Local Farmers Send Christmas Trees to Troops

In photos: Sally Ellms (in red apron) enjoys taking part in the process; and Christmas trees being loaded at Ellms Family Farm. Photos by Chip Ellms. 

CHARLTON – It is an annual holiday ritual that Chip Ellms has grown accustomed to: dozens of people descending on his family’s property to fill a FedEx trailer full of Christmas trees, which are then shipped to those serving in the military.  

“We really have a lot of help,” Ellms said this week, more or less recovered from the flurry of activity on Monday at his Charlton Road farm.

As part of a national Trees for Troops program organized by the FedEx Corp. and the Christmas SPIRIT Foundation, more than 150 trees—donated by the Ellms family as well as other local farmers and businesses—were tied up and stacked for delivery to Fort Bragg in North Carolina.

“It brings people a little bit of home,” Ellms said. 

For 27 years, Ellms has been selling Christmas trees grown on his family’s roughly 220 acres of property. It was in the early 2000s, he remembered, that a group of New York farmers decided they would start lifting the spirits of U.S. troops with tree donations.

Then FedEx signed on to provide key logistical support.

The Christmas SPIRIT Foundation serves as a liaison between tree suppliers and the U.S. Defense Department to determine where the shipments go each year, Ellms said. One farm in Ohio supplies most of the trees that are sent overseas, he added.  

Ellms indicated that he and his wife, Sally, were joined in the Nov. 27 loading by their children Garth and Ashley Ellms DiPaola; active-duty personnel from the 109th Airlift Wing at Stratton Air National Guard Base in Glenville; students in the Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake School District; Girl Scouts; and for the first time, he said, Patriot Guard Riders.  

“It’s really my favorite part of Christmas,” offered Sally Ellms.

The young ladies present donated star-themed Christmas ornaments cut from “retired flags” that were previously flown at various municipal offices, according to Chip Ellms. 

In a prepared statement, the FedEx Corp. and Christmas SPIRIT Foundation reported that the Trees for Troops program has been organized for 13 years. This year, a delivery “milestone” of 200,000 trees will be surpassed.

The shipments reach every branch of the military, directly impacting service members scattered across domestic and international bases. 

“The Trees For Troops program is about more than just delivering trees—we are delivering a piece of the Christmas spirit to our U.S. military and their families,” said Mike Ducker, president and CEO of FedEx Freight. “To be able to say we’ve helped bring more than 200,000 trees to so many of our heroes is an honor, and it shows our appreciation for the sacrifice these men and women and their families have made for our country.” 

Thursday, 30 November 2017 21:35

Final Site Cleanup Needed in Wilton

WILTON – Construction of a new Cumberland Farms store at the intersection of Daniels Road and Maple Avenue is being held up by an environmental cleanup at the site.

Wilton resident Ross Galloway, the site acquisition and development manager for First Hartford Corp. in Connecticut, confirmed last week that a real-estate transaction has not been finalized for the property.

The state Department of Labor is conducting “oversight” of a cleanup project whose completion is required by the current property owner, he explained.

Soil and water tested clean at the site but certain amounts of asbestos and lead paint were found in the debris of a home that was destroyed by fire, according to Galloway.   

Previously, Galloway had expected construction of the new Cumberland Farms to start in September, following the issuance of final approvals from Wilton town officials.

“We just want to make sure it’s all clean,” he said. 

For more information about asbestos, visit the website https://www.maacenter.org/asbestos/

Thursday, 30 November 2017 21:28

New Van is Ready for Wilton Seniors

Ready for the road in Wilton (left to right): MaryAnne Tagliento, Susie Barber, Thomas R. Drew Sr. and Robin Corrigan. Photo by Larry Goodwin. 

WILTON – Earlier this week, Robin Corrigan admitted her relief in knowing that her 2004 Cadillac will no longer be used to transport local seniors to and from the Lillian W. Worth Senior Center on Traver Road.

“It costs me, big time,” Corrigan said.

For the last two years, the senior center director was using her gas-guzzling personal vehicle to transport Wilton residents each week to the cozy space in the town complex.

Of the seniors who gather there regularly for coffee, cookies and games, among other activities, most drive themselves in their own vehicles. Still, a handful do rely on rides.  

In September, the Wilton Town Board authorized the purchase of a new van for $37,000 to be used exclusively for that purpose, ensuring that Corrigan is able to remain at the senior center on the days it is open.

On Tuesday, Corrigan and several others took a break from the action inside the senior center to demonstrate the functionality and comfort of the handicap-accessible van that was purchased. Next week, the white Dodge BraunAbility officially goes on the road. 

Secretary to the Supervisor Nancy Riely has reviewed the experience and credentials of several driver candidates. She said Federal Bureau of Investigation background checks are part of that process. 

Soon, Riely added, Wilton town logos will be affixed to the vehicle.

Corrigan’s husband, John, has been selected as the main driver of the van. Yet several other individuals are being considered as well, including Ann and Charles Collins and Lynn Green, according to Corrigan.

A maximum of four people are allowed in the van for any given trip. At present, only three Wilton seniors require transport each week to and from the Lillian W. Worth center, but that number usually increases in bad weather, Corrigan said.

She added that the main driver should expect to make three separate trips with seniors in the new van, especially on Tuesdays.   

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Blotter

  • COURT Nicholas J. Valcik, 34, of Ballston Spa, pleaded Dec. 5 to promoting prison contraband in the first-degree. Sentencing scheduled Jan. 30, 2018.  Trevor J. Hammar, 29, of Milton, pleaded Dec. 5 to felony burglary, and two felony counts grand larceny in connection with incidents suspected of taking place in Milton in October. Sentencing scheduled for Jan. 30.  Lana M. Senecal, 28, of Middle Grove, pleaded Dec. 6 to felony grand larceny in connection with an incident in Malta. Placed on interim probation to include Treatment Court.  Blake E. Labarge, 25, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced Dec. 6 to five…

Property Transactions

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